2018 00 iPhone Brian 739

It’s amazing how much you can destroy with a sawzall, sledgehammer and a couple guys at first light.  Father Steve asked the Knights to help tear down a couple cabinets in the sacristy.   Out with the old (and I’m NOT talking about these fine gentlemen) and in with the new.  As luck would have it, Mark and Steve actually know what they’re doing.  Claudio and I are hanging around mostly for comic relief.  Father, well, he’s the foreman.

Pictured, left to right, Mark DePaola, Father Steve Reckker, Steve Betka, Claudio Selva and Joe Suminski.

banner 2018-02-02_8-17-59

Men: Are You Ready to accept the Challenge?

Our communities need strong Catholic men to answer the call to lead with faith, protect our families, serve others and defend our values. For over one hundred years, Knights of Columbus have done exactly that, standing up for the Church, serving the least among us, and strengthening our parishes and families.  Eligible Catholic men can now join the Knights of Columbus online in a simple, streamlined process.

As a member, you join a worldwide community of nearly two million men, including more than 65,000 in Michigan, who stand together.  Men have a duty to lead, protect, serve and defend. The world needs more committed, unified Catholic men to answer the call. Will you answer?

Visit HERE to learn more about the many benefits of membership in the Knights
of Columbus. For information about Michigan State Council activities, click HERE,
and for K of C Supreme Council national and international activities, click HERE.

Have questions and want to talk to a real person?

@ St Clement, call Jim Smiszek, 586-752-2856 or Karrie Illner, 586-337-4225

@SS John and Paul call Joe Martino, 586-292-5021

Subscribe to our Newsletters – link here

I was at church this week on Monday.  We were having a First Degree.  I was there just helping get stuff set up.  We had a good turn-out and I didn’t stay until the end of the ceremony.    As I was leaving, about 7:15 pm or so, I saw the light on in the Sanctuary.  I then heard the prayers in unison from across the silent church.  As they do most nights, a group gathers in the evening and offers prayers.

Standing there, listening to them in a mostly dark church on a cold January day, I couldn’t help but wonder if this is what praying sounds like to God.   We Knights send out many prayer requests for our members and their family’s.  We see requests from friends on Facebook that say “pray for me” or “keep me in your prayers.”  There’s something special about praying in community, everyone saying the same thing, at the same time.   Before our meetings, many of us gather and pray a Rosary together, in a community.

I have this great app on my iPhone, it’s called Divine Office.  It always starts out with the following introduction.

From ancient times, the Church has had the custom of celebrating each day the liturgy of hours.   In this way, the Church fulfills the Lords precept to pray without ceasing, at once offering praise to God the Father and interceding for the salvation of the world.

One of the many cool features is the “Now In Prayer” view.  It lights up the planet with people who are actively using the app (and therefore we can assume, praying.)

File Jan 10, 3 55 54 PM . world.png

I’d like to see this same view with all the people praying in any format, in a community, in their car, in bed before going to sleep, in the morning before getting up, etc.  I suspect the globe would be awash in light.

“We have no command to work and to pass the night in vigils and to fast constantly. However, we do have an obligation to ‘pray without ceasing.’” This quotation from Evagrius Ponticus (c. 345-399), is a good reflection of the belief of the early Christians about prayer. In the letters of St. Paul we frequently see the injunction to pray ceaselessly, as, for example in 1 Thessalonians 5:17(“Pray without ceasing”) and Romans 12:12 (“Be constant in prayer”), and Ephesians 6:18 (“Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit”). In the Gospels themselves, Jesus emphasizes persistent prayer, as in Luke 18 where Jesus taught the disciples a parable “to the effect that they ought always to pray and not lose heart.” These passages of Scripture were taken very seriously by the early Church and much discussion was given to this idea and how it could be achieved.”  (Taken from Portsmouth Abbey website document here.)

Praying in community at St Clement of Rome on a cold January evening.



You know, sometimes it really is the little things that bring the most joy.  Our crack Advocate Karrie Illner noticed our By-Laws were woefully out of date.  By-Laws need to be reviewed and voted on every ten years.  Karrie got Mike McKinnon involved to update and edit our last published By-Laws.  Yesterday, a big box of printed By-Laws showed up at the house.  They look nice.

One of the first pages is a current list of officers.  I’ve been gathering up all the picture albums in various cabinets in our Knights room at St Clement.  I’ve been scanning and posting them out here.  I figure it’s part of the history and having it available online is better than a photo album no one sees in a locked cabinet.  The reason I mention it is because last night, I picked up the “next” album.  It was from 1977.

Going through all those old pictures and letters of congratulations, it occurred to me, many of the original guys are still around.   Some of the guys have gone home and others are MIA.  I wonder what the officer’s list will look like in 10 years?  I wonder if anyone will notice the By-Laws actually need to be updated.

Someone make a note for fall for 2027.   I’ll bring these to the Knights room.  Please pick up a copy and review.


I stopped by the church this morning and reloaded our Kiosk.  If you’ve not had an opportunity to stop by and check out our complimentary booklet series, please do.  There will be ALOT of folks at church over the next couple days.  Encourage them to have a look and take a book that appeals to them.  A little Christmas gift from the Knights of Columbus to you.

2017 00 iPhone Brian 2319


Since 1948 CIS has been the major evangelical arm of the Knights of Columbus. Through multiple booklet series and various media formats, CIS makes our Catholic faith accessible and provides continuing tools for catechesis and spiritual formation. Knights of Columbus councils should use the complete library of CIS materials in their membership formation as well as promote them for parish continuing education, youth catechesis and spiritual study groups.

The Building the Domestic church series builds on this tradition and presents some of the most popular CIS resources aimed at helping us to live out the Church’s mission and vision for our families. Series topics include parenting, fatherhood and family prayer life, as well as two of St. John Paul II’s famous messages for the family – Letter to Families and The Family in the Modern World.